Treadmill Training for Beginning Runners

Treadmill Training for Beginning Runners

Are you serious about starting a running program but you are not yet ready to step outside? Then you come to the right place. The treadmill is the exact tool you need for the job.

If you are a beginner runner, then you will need to ease into your running to give your body time to adapt to the high impact nature of running. If you get too sore from the get go, chances are high that you will never run again.

And here is why the treadmill is perfect for beginners.

Benefits

The treadmill is ideal for beginners because you can easily fine-tune the machine’s speed and incline, which can help you design a workout program that fits with your own needs and fitness level, guaranteed.

Not only that, the treadmill is also more merciful on your feet and knees than asphalt or concrete. Plus, the treadmill offers a safe, handy way to keep exercising even when it’s dark, freezing cold or dangerously hot outdoors.

Start Right – The Beginner’s Routine you Need

The ideal way to get started if you have never hopped on a treadmill before is to take things slow. So if this is your first time on the treadmill, then be sure to not push yourself too hard on your first few workouts. Make safety the priority.

This workout alternate between walking, jogging and running to get your heart rate up while also preparing  your body for more intensity. With this beginner interval program you will be spending a total of 20 minutes walking at a brisk pace, 8 minutes jogging and 2 minutes running at a comfortable pace.

From first glace that’s not a lot of running but it adds up, and as you get fitter, be sure to increase the time spent jogging and running, and take less and less time walking.

0:00-10:00: 10 minutes Warm-up

Start your workout with at least 10 minutes of walking at a pace of 1.5 to 2 mph—that’s roughly 2.4 to 3.2 km/h—with no incline. The warm-up is vital because it will help you prepare for the physical demands ahead by increasing body temperature and boosting blood flow to the working muscles.

10:00-15:00: 5 minutes of jogging slowly

For the next five minute, jog slowly at a pace of 3 mph. Please be mindful here, and take a break if you need one.

15:00-16:00 One Minute of intensity

In case you feel confident about your fitness skill, increase the speed to at least 3.5 to 4 mph for one full minute. Nevertheless, feel free to boost or decrease the speed and intensity as you see fit. Nothing is written in stone here. So let your comfort level be your ultimate measuring stick.

16:00- 20:00: 4 minutes of recovery

Take the speed down to 1.5 to 2 mph and fully recover. Breathe deeply and relax your body.

20:00-23:00: 3 minutes of slow jogging

Start jogging again at 3 to 3.5 mph and get ready for the next boot of intensity.

23:00-24:00: One minute of high intensity

Increase your speed to at least 4 mph for one full minute. If you can do more, then increase the incline to 3 percent.

24:00-30:00: The Cool Down

Finally you have made it. Congrats!

Now slow down your pace and end your workout with a cool down by walking slowly for at least 5 minutes.. Breathe deeply and release all tension.

How much

Try to perform this workout two to three times per week with at least one rest day between sessions. As you get fitter, make sure to lengthen the running part until you are able to run for 30-minute straight without much huffing and puffing.

Once you can run for at least 30 minute without trouble at a comfortable pace, then, and only then, you can up the ante and move onto more challenging treadmill workouts.

 

About the Author

David Dack is an avid runner and fitness enthusiast. He is a regular contributor to some of the major fitness magazines and websites. For more tips go to his blog Runner Blueprint.

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